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Archive for May, 2017

Corporate Governance and the Sharing Economy

In a world of robots interacting with humans and learning out of the process, while connected with all other robots in a network; in a world of artificial intelligence, disruptive technologies and new business models arising from them; in this world regulation starts to change: why do we need CFA`s in a world where financial advise is produced with algorithms? In this world firms also start to reject IPOs fearing their innovation capacities would fade away, (Uber, Airbnb, …), or introduce dual-class share systems to keep control on it and the long-term perspective.

Mark Fenwick and Erik P.M. Vermeulen in a paper called “How the Sharing Economy is Transforming “Corporate Governance”, (1) refer to the new changes Corporate Governance faces and needs if boards are to gather survival and success for their companies.

For them what is relevant is whether these new big companies are able to develop a system that is inclusive of all stakeholders, (shareholders interests, oversight, and other currently accepted needs fall apart).

Screenshot - 14_05_2017 , 21_05_35

(Source (1)) Read more…

How to conquer a rational long-term growth path, by Juan María Nin.

With a Neo-Austrian economic background and a deep knowledge of the roots of the Great Recession started in 2008, (dated well before though) Juan María Nin explains in his recently published book, titled “For a rational (economic) growth” and subtitled “From the Great Recession to Stagnation: Solutions to compete un a Digital World”(1), his recommendations for structural change. He states thar our economies need to escape from the current low-growth or recession situation and from the institutions and structures that generated it since we accepted: (i) A money generation monopoly by Central banks or similar institutions, (Fed); (ii) a fractionary reserve banking system and the subsequent working capital structural deficit in the banking industry; (iii) a monetary policy-led constant inflationary pressure, the bubbles arising from them, and the banking failures emerging from them; (iv) the necessary last resort lender role of central banks and the public support when things go bad for the private bank balances, (v) a tacit agreement in exchange for the loans granted to the public sector in his unstoppable growth path.

He suggests some structural and institutional changes if a rational path for growth not blindly based in debt, inflation and low interest rates is to be pursued: Read more…